Virginia – A Wonderful Wordless Mystery Game

Virginia by Variable StateIf you love mysteries in the form of books or movies, you’re definitely going to love one in the form of a video game, especially if you are an avid gamer. In that case, you’ll love Virginia.

While Variable State has revealed a new anthology drama called Last Stop, coming to Xbox soon, their Virginia is still popular due to its fantastic cinematographic style, use of subtle character animation, and a wonderful unfolding of storyline and deep interesting characters without a single dialogue.

You are the protagonist character of Anne Tarver who is working as an FBI agent on the disappearance of a boy in the quiet rustic town of Kingdom Virginia. Maria Halperin is Anne’s assistant and doesn’t know that Anne is actually keeping an eye on her as ordered by the internal affairs department.

Halperin’s office in the basement, the bureau’s dislike about her and efforts to keep her out of sight, all may seem ‘spooky’ to you and yes, Virginia greatly resembles with the mystery TV shows of the 90s like Twin Peaks or X-Files.

Another remarkable feature of Virginia is the pace at which scenes are changed. At a moment, you are in your bed, the other moment you’re driving your car, next moment you’re in front of a door of a home and so on. In short, you’re pushed from one moment to the next and you hardly get a chance to speak with anyone. If at all you try to explore the environment, you may find that you’d be encouraged to do so, however, barring a few things, you may hardly get anything to find about and you may stop your exploration.

Sometimes you may even feel that you’re not actually Anne, but are just observing her life rather than living it, and you’re listening to the story of Virginia that is filled with drama, but not participating in it.

However, this doesn’t mean that you won’t find the game interesting. On the contrary, its style and sense will keep you captivated all the time. Especially the exploration of Anne’s subconscious in the form of dream sequences will keep you engaged. Moreover, music composed by Lyndon Holland and performed by Prague Philharmonic Orchestra is a great plus point. Besides being extremely melodious, it also acts as a tool that narrates the story, which is especially interesting because of the absence of dialogues.

So, when are you going to start playing Virginia?

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